48832G AMDr E RGB Report: AMD to rebrand Low end Radeon HD 7000 for OEMs

AMD is planning to rebrand their low-end Radeon HD 7000 products, for OEMs only. Every AMD product from Radeon HD 7600 down will essentially be using GPUs from Northern Islands and even Evergreen families. As expected, a large factor behind this significant restructuring is the rise of APUs. 

AMD is planning to rebrand their low-end Radeon HD 7000 products, for OEMs only. Every AMD product from Radeon HD 7600 down will essentially be using GPUs from Northern Islands and even Evergreen families. As expected, a large factor behind this significant restructuring is the rise of APUs. 

AMD and NVIDIA have both announced their low-end "next-gen" mobile parts – Radeon HD 7000M and GeForce 600M. Both featured rebrands. While AMD slightly re-specced the HD 7000M parts, the 600M GPUs were direct rebrands from the 500M series. The rumour mill had strongly suggested that the 7000M/600M rebrands were largely foreshadowing a similar fate for the desktop market – so it is not as surprising that AMD is making this move. 

hd7000 discrete lineup1 Report: AMD to rebrand Low end Radeon HD 7000 for OEMs

The performance and enthusiast end still continue to feature brand new, GCN-based, 28nm GPUs. From Radeon HD 7900 down to HD 7700. However, the rebrands begin with HD 7600. Replacing the HD 6670 will be HD 7670 – both based on Turks XT while Turks Pro will feature in HD 7570. HD 7450 will be based on Caicos. The lowest-end HD 7300 series will reprise Cedar – first released as HD 5400 nearly two years ago. We can expect some minor clock boosts to slightly differentiate them from their predecessors. The line-up looks sparse with lots of empty spaces for a good reason – it will be filled by Trinity APUs. 

One of AMD's main problems in recent years has been supply, rather than demand. From GPUs, APUs to CPUs, AMD products have built a dubious reputation to be supply constrained most of the times. By splitting the range between 28nm and 40nm, AMD is distributing resources and ensuring greater wafer starts at 28nm dedicated to the high-end GPUs. Another reason could be the costly nature of a cutting-edge process, and low-end GPUs are better off at 40nm. With Fusion APUs effectively replacing the lower end, the demand is decreasing as well. In addition, AMD is also moving these parts to OEMs, and retail availability of the same is unknown. 

Source: SemiAccurate