Research In Motion changes name to BlackBerry

rim blackberry Research In Motion changes name to BlackBerry

Canadian smartphone firm Research In Motion (RIM) has ditched its ambiguous title for the more well-known moniker of its mobile operating system, BlackBerry.

Canadian smartphone firm Research In Motion (RIM) has ditched its ambiguous title for the more well-known moniker of its mobile operating system, BlackBerry.

 
The move coincides with the launch of BlackBerry 10, the company's latest attempt to take on big rivals like Apple, Google and Samsung. The long-awaited and frequently delayed new OS and smartphones are seen by many analysts as a defining moment in the company's history, a make or break affair as far as many are concerned.
 
Given the importance of the occasion, and the fact that RIM is pitching BlackBerry 10 as a “re-invention,” the change in company name is appropriately timed and might even help give the firm more recognition, given the fact that “Research In Motion” is a relatively unknown and unpopular name among consumers, while BlackBerry is the opposite.
 
bb10 Research In Motion changes name to BlackBerry
Will a company name change help BlackBerry 10?
 
The change means the company's website, RIM.com, will be redirecting to BlackBerry.com, and all email extensions will also change. A bigger deal for investors is the change to the stock exchange ticker symbols, with BB to be employed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and BBRY to be used on the NASDAQ. These changes will come into effect from 4 February.
 
“This change from Research In Motion to BlackBerry comes at a defining moment in our company's history,” said Thorsten Heins, President and CEO of the company formerly known as RIM. “RIM created the first BlackBerry smartphone and changed the way millions of people around the world stay connected. We have used that same ingenuity and innovation to redefine mobile computing with BlackBerry 10. As we launch BlackBerry 10 around the world, now is the right time to adopt the iconic BlackBerry name.”
 
Ernest Doku, technology expert at uSwitch.com, described the name change as "just as bold" as the Z10's lack of a physical keyboard. “Today BlackBerry is betting everything on its all-new operating system,” he said.