GAMEPLAY PT. 2

However, while it does take away some old toys, the game most certainly also gives you new ones. And by that, I mean you get an awesome new bow and arrow. It seems almost a trend today that everyone needs a bow: Connor in Assassin’s Creed III, Lara Croft in Tomb Raider, Corvo in Dishonored… but maybe there’s a reason for this, because if Prophet’s bow is anything to go by, it’s a good trend to follow. Armed with four different arrow types (regular, electric, antipersonnel, explosive), the bow is easy to target with and usually kills in one shot. If that isn’t enough, you can even adjust bow torque to give your arrows more impact, though doing so will reduce the draw speed. Furthermore, it’s silent, and firing it doesn’t penalize your suit’s power level, as so many other weapons do. Also, it makes you feel like Rambo.

The other weapons aren’t bad though, and every one of them is customizable with various attachments and scopes. Switching attachments depending on your situation is absolutely recommended, and adds much more complexity to the gameplay. Your suit also has customization options allowing you to spend upgrade points found throughout the city on various new abilities, (such as highlighting enemy fire or footsteps), in order to give you an edge.

 

Crysis3 21 Review: Crysis 3 (PC)

The Predator Bow with all of it's customizable option. I like to call it the Rambow.

 

Enemy AI is generally quite competent. Though enemies can be predictable in their actions, and though they will sometimes make foolish mistakes, they are generally good at tactics, and will flank you or try to flush you out with grenades. If they lose sight of you, they will pan out and search the area; they will react to dead bodies, investigate thrown objects and sometimes, if you’re menacing enough, they’ll panic and shoot at nothing. Once they know you’re there though, they’re likely to call in backup, so make sure nobody is sneaking up on you, whom you’ve yet to highlight in your suit’s visor.

 

The enemy’s mobility makes them a significant threat whenever your power is low. You’ll spend many times praying they won’t come your way until you’ve recharged, or that they’ll turn around and look the other way before your cloak disengages. It can be stressful in a way that most “shooting gallery simulators” just can’t replicate.

 

crysis3 2013 02 27 23 22 39 159 Review: Crysis 3 (PC)

Unfortunately, too much of the game is spent in corridors… pretty corridors, but corridors nonetheless.

 

I need to point out though, that Crytek is bending the truth in its marketing about what kind of game you’ll be experiencing. Ever since the first game came out, I’ve heard the same thing – that Crysis is a sandbox shooter. If I were to be nice, I could argue that Crytek means the game can be played in a range of different ways, from stealthy to action-oriented; but we all know that when you say sandbox, we think open world; and it isn’t. The Crysis games have never been open world. They do a good job of making the environments seem natural, and they often open up the map so it seems like you’re free roaming… but the games are filled with invisible walls. It’s an illusion and it needs to be pointed out, because the game makes such a good job of masking it. Eventually, you’ll end up being disappointed like I was the first time I wanted to take a short cut on Lingshan island in Crysis 1 and discovered cliff walls funneling me along one path. Crysis 3 is less restrictive than it’s city and sewer dwelling predecessor, but there’s really no way to get lost in the game. It’s going to be a very scenic and beautiful journey, but it will be a corridor shooter all the way to the end, interlaced with semi-open areas to give you the illusion of freedom.