Intel’s next generation Sandy Bridge, arriving in Q1 2011, is rumoured to have up to 2 GPUs on die. What is most impressive is that the entire package will be a single monolithic die. Thus, we are talking about a quad core CPU + 2 GPUs on a single die.

It is not clear as to why Intel would use 2 GPUs on one die, however. Though the next generation Intel IGPs are rumoured to be far superior, they will still pale in comparison to mainstream discrete GPUs from ATI or Nvidia.

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Intel’s next generation Sandy Bridge, arriving in Q1 2011, is rumoured
to have up to 2 GPUs on die. What is most impressive is that the entire
package will be a single monolithic die. Thus, we are talking about a
quad core CPU + 2 GPUs on a single die.

It is not clear as to
why Intel would use 2 GPUs on one die, however. Though the next
generation Intel IGPs are rumoured to be far superior, they will still
pale in comparison to mainstream discrete GPUs from ATI or Nvidia.

It does sound like a bit of an odd feature – but Intel may have a trick up its sleeves. On the AMD side of things, AMD’s first Fusion APU (AMD’s terminology for GPU + CPU on a single die), codenamed Llano, releases approximately a quarter after Sandy Bridge. In terms of CPU power, the AMD’s aging Phenom II core in Llano will be far behind Sandy Bridge. However, Llano’s 400 SP Radeon HD 5000 class GPU will be superior to Intel’s IGP in Sandy Bridge. Perhaps the reason for 2 GPUs is simply Intel trying to close the gap. However, Fusion’s GPU will still have a comfortable performance lead. AMD also have a next generation microarchitecture releasing around the same time as Fusion, codenamed Zambezi.

Both sets of CPUs are still about a year away from release, and much can change.

Reference: Fudzilla