Fudzilla reports that Nvidia’s Fermi architecture-based GF100 chips will ship in three variants.

The three variants are a dual-GPU flagship, a high-end single GPU and a performance single GPU – all based on the same GF100 chip.

First up is the full version – with all 16 SM units – running at maximum clock speeds. This will be the single GPU flagship, a replacement for the GTX 285. It is expected to end up faster than the Radeon HD 5870, while being more expensive, hotter and bigger as well.
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Fudzilla reports that Nvidia’s Fermi architecture-based GF100 chips will
ship in three variants.

The three variants are a dual-GPU
flagship, a high-end single GPU and a performance single GPU – all based
on the same GF100 chip.

First up is the full version – with all
16 SM units – running at maximum clock speeds. This will be the single
GPU flagship, a replacement for the GTX 285. It is expected to end up
faster than the Radeon HD 5870, while being more expensive, hotter and
bigger as well.

Second is the performance product – a cut down GF100, with perhaps 1 or 2 SM units disabled, or 448 or 480 shaders and lower clock speeds. A cut down memory interface can also be expected – perhaps 320 bit, reflecting the G80 line-up. This will be the replacement for the GTX 260, and will line up strongly against the HD 5850.

While these two are no surprise – Fudzilla insists a dual-GF100 monster is in the works as well for release on the very same day. This is rather surprising, as it will be quite a challenge to fit 6+ billion transistors within the 300W TDP (GF100 is expected to be around 225W TDP), even with SM units disabled and lower clocks, especially releasing on the same day as the single-GPU products. Overall – this looks like GT200 vs. RV770 all over again – except this time Nvidia is several months late.

Fudzilla also claims all three variants are set to ship in December 2009, something that is very much doubted, as Xbitlabs documents.

Competitors to the HD 5700 in the more affordable <$200 mainstream is expected in 2010.

On a related note, as an update to our previous article about the dummy Fermi boardFudzilla reports than a senior VP at Nvidia has clarified that the board demonstrated was indeed a dummy. The official reason is that the actual Fermi card was a messy-looking engineering sample. Still, you would expect them to have revealed this right when they showed off the dummy in first place. Furthermore, Charlie claims Nvidia PR had previously told him “The product that we displayed is an actual Fermi board”, which, if true, seems rather contradictory.

Reference: Fudzilla