This fall, Samsung plans to follow up its wildly successful Galaxy Note and hopefully repeat the performance with its latest offering, the Galaxy Note 2. While most sources have pegged the release date as sometime in October, other sources have reported that Samsung will release the new model in September in an effort to beat the new iPad to the street.

 
This fall, Samsung plans to follow up its wildly successful Galaxy Note and hopefully repeat the performance with its latest offering, the Galaxy Note 2. While most sources have pegged the release date as sometime in October, other sources have reported that Samsung will release the new model in September in an effort to beat the new iPad to the street.
 
The latest "phablet" is said to sport a slightly larger 5.5 inch screen, featuring a precursor to Samsung's flexible screen, the 'Unbreakable Plane'. The new smartphone will come equipped with a quadcore processor and is rumored come with 2 GB of memory and run the latest Android 4.1 'Jelly Bean' OS. An insider disclosed that "the camera resolution of the new model is expected to be around 12-13 MP, a considerable improvement over the 8MP of its predecessor, the Galaxy Note."  
 
Galaxy Note 2 boasts improved memo and document editing features. After the introduction of the original Galaxy Note, Samsung offered various writing features including 'S Note' through 'Premium Sweet Upgrade' and the Galaxy Note 2 is anticipated to have professional writing features for several specialized fields.
 
An insider has reported that the writing features supported by Galaxy Note 2 will be further specialized into general business, design, and sales, each of which needs special memo features. The new technologies including the sensor technology introduced to 'Galaxy S3' are said to be limited on Galaxy Note 2, however compatiblilty with other devices has been improved.
 
Pantech, in second place behind Samsung in the South Korean smartphone market, is planning to release a 5.3 inch quad-core smartphone with a capacitive screen  this October. 
 
As the demands for bigger screen smartphones increase  smartphone makers are responding accordingly.  Composing documents and playing games, the features that used to be exclusive to tablet PCs or laptops, are now arriving on 'big' smartphones.
 
Reference: MK