Samsung is investigating an incident where one of its Galaxy S III smartphones exploded in a user's car, raising fears over potential overheating problems.

Samsung is investigating an incident where one of its Galaxy S III smartphones exploded in a user's car, raising fears over potential overheating problems.

 
A user in Dublin, Ireland reported that during a commute he noticed white flame and sparks coming from the device before it exploded on the dashboard of his car.
 
“The phone burned from the inside out,” the user wrote in a post at popular Irish forum Boards.ie. “Burned through the plastic and melted my case to my phone. The phone kept working but without any signal.”
 
Samsung claims that its initial investigation found no fault with the phone, but it intended to conduct further investigations. The user admits that the fault may have been caused by a combination of the car mount and the car's heating system. The pictures provided by the user show scorch marks at the bottom of the phone, with the battery appearing untouched, suggesting it may not be the reason for the incident.
 
“That could have burned the side of my face or through my pocket and my leg, or set fire to my bed,” the user said. “Its very dangerous.”
 
 
Despite not admitting fault over this issue, Samsung gave the Irish user a new phone and promised “free stuff” as compensation.
 
This appears to be the first report of an overheating problem with Samsung's latest flagship model, but a previous incident with a spare Galaxy S II battery in March, when a Korean schoolboy claimed that it exploded in his back pocket, may cause users some concern. Samsung denied that this incident was an issue of overheating, however, putting it down to massive external pressure.
 
Samsung is not alone with overheating fears. Apple's ambitiously named “new iPad” reportedly suffered overheating problems when it launched in March.
 
The Samsung Galaxy S III launched in Europe at the end of May and in the US yesterday. It makes its debut in South Korea on Monday, but reports of safety issues could hamper initial sales.
 
Source: Reuters