Samsung has simultaneously licensed Big Blue’s chipmaking technology, signed on to use IBM Microelectronics’ chip foundry service, and joined an IBM-backed partnership focused on future chip-manufacturing processes. Samsung will participate in the partnership, which currently includes IBM, Infineon and Chartered Semiconductor. The partnership will help the companies move to the next generation in chip manufacturing, known as the 65-nanometer process, and later to progress to the 45-nanometer process. Meanwhile, Samsung has also licensed IBM 90nm chipmaking technology for use in manufacturing system-on-chip, or SOC, processors for electronics devices, such as high-definition televisions. IBM has also recently licensed technology to AMD and Microsoft for that company’s Xbox. IBM has also signed up Nvidia as a foundry customer and is currently manufacturing chips for the graphics chipmaker. IBM expects to begin manufacturing 65-nanometer chips in late 2005 as part of its agreement with Sony. IBM and others are currently producing chips using a 90-nanometer manufacturing process.

Samsung has simultaneously licensed Big Blue’s chipmaking technology, signed on to use IBM Microelectronics’ chip foundry service, and joined an IBM-backed partnership focused on future chip-manufacturing processes. Samsung will participate in the partnership, which currently includes IBM, Infineon and Chartered Semiconductor. The partnership will help the companies move to the next generation in chip manufacturing, known as the 65-nanometer process, and later to progress to the 45-nanometer process. Meanwhile, Samsung has also licensed IBM 90nm chipmaking technology for use in manufacturing system-on-chip, or SOC, processors for electronics devices, such as high-definition televisions. IBM has also recently licensed technology to AMD and Microsoft for that company’s Xbox. IBM has also signed up Nvidia as a foundry customer and is currently manufacturing chips for the graphics chipmaker. IBM expects to begin manufacturing 65-nanometer chips in late 2005 as part of its agreement with Sony. IBM and others are currently producing chips using a 90-nanometer manufacturing process.