Samsung refuses to settle patent lawsuits with Apple

 Samsung refuses to settle patent lawsuits with Apple

Samsung has refused to settle its patent lawsuits with arch-rival Apple, despite sales bans and damages payments worth millions of dollars.

Samsung has refused to settle its patent lawsuits with arch-rival Apple, despite sales bans and damages payments worth millions of dollars.

 
J.K. Shin, head of mobile at Samsung, told journalists that the company had “no such intention,” after he was asked if Samsung would follow suit with HTC's recent settlement.
 
It is not surprising that Samsung would refuse to give in, as HTC's settlement is believed to have cost it between $5 and $20 per handset in a deal that will last 10 years, according to The Telegraph. The price per unit would likely be considerably higher for a Samsung settlement.
 
There is also too much at stake in the mobile market, with Samsung leading the charge as the top smartphone maker in the world, despite fierce competition from Apple and other companies. Any kind of deal could weaken Samsung's position and profits, and also appear like an admittance of guilt on the issue of patent infringement.
 
 Samsung refuses to settle patent lawsuits with Apple
 
On one hand Samsung is suffering from the endless lawsuits, with a US court ruling that it had copied features of the iPhone and iPad and ordering it to pay $1.05 billion to Apple. Samsung is appealing that ruling.
 
On the other hand, Samsung won a case in the UK, where Apple was forced to publish an apology on its website. The judge was also unhappy with Apple's half-hearted letter and ordered it to change it to something more fitting of his original request.
 
Samsung might be hoping to ratchet up a few more victories in other countries before considering talks with Apple, as this would strengthen its position and potentially pave the way for a mutual agreement to license each other's patents with no financial transaction whatsoever. Whether or not either side could swallow their pride and accept such terms remains to be seen.
 
Source: The Telegraph