SamsungLogo Samsung unleashes multiple mobile building blocks

It's actually quite amazing how many products Samsung makes and there's no wonder that the company is starting to have such a dominant place in the mobile market space. The company announced no less than five new products related to mobile products, a new HD CMOS sensor, a 16Megapixel CMOS sensor, faster 64GB eMMC flash memory, 3Xnm LPDDR3 memory and a new 1.5GHz Exynos SoC manufactured using a 32nm High-K Metal Gate low-power process.

It's actually quite amazing how many products Samsung makes and there's no wonder that the company is starting to have such a dominant place in the mobile market space. The company announced no less than five new products related to mobile products, a new HD CMOS sensor, a 16Megapixel CMOS sensor, faster 64GB eMMC flash memory, 3Xnm LPDDR3 memory and a new 1.5GHz Exynos SoC manufactured using a 32nm High-K Metal Gate low-power process.

The HD CMOS sensor is maybe not the most impressive of the announcements, but the S5K8AA as it's called is a tiny 1/8.2-inch CMOS sensor with a 1.2Megapixel resolution and the entire camera modules is a mere 2.8mm deep. The trick here is that it'll do 720p30 video or 480p60 and combined with backside illumination it should make for better video call quality in slim handsets and tablets.

On the other end of the spectrum is the 1/2.3-inch 16Megapixel CMOS sensor called the S5K2P1, that's the same size sensor as in the recently launched Pentax Q interchangeable lens compact and larger than that found in many budget digital cameras. Although this backside illuminated sensor was designed with high-end smartphones in mind, it can also be used with digital cameras and camcorders and it shows that phones are getting very close to entirely replacing entry level digital cameras, at least as long as you're not worried about having the ability to zoom. Samsung makes some impressive claims for the S5K2P1 as well, as it's meant to shoot 16Megapixle images at 30fps, or 8.3Megapixel pictures at 60fps, all without any shutter lag effect in 16:9 format.

Moving on we get to a product you're going to want in the same phone as the 16Megapixel camera sensor, namely 64GB of eMMC NAND flash. Samsung's latest eMMC NAND flash uses a toggle DDR2 interface and is manufactured using Samsung's 2Xnm process. Samsung claims sequential read speeds of 80MB/s and write speeds of 40MB/s which the company claims is a threefold improvement over fast microSD cards. No-one's going to complain about faster storage memory on their phones, right?

On the subject of memory, we swiftly move on to Samsung's 3Xnm LPDDR3 memory which is available in 4Gbit (512MB) chips, which might not seem like a lot, but it's the first DDR3 1,066MHz memory designed for use in smartphones and tablets. Not only is it faster than LPDDR2, but Samsung also claims that it uses 20 percent less power which equals to better device battery life. Sadly Samsung's LPDDR3 memory won't go into mass production until sometime next year, but it should hopefully be ready in time for the onslaught of new quad core ARM SoC's such as Nvidia's next gen Tegra model which will be able to take advantage of LPDDR3 memory.

Finally we have yet another first, Samsung's new Exynos 4212 ARM Cortex-A9 SoC which is built on Samsung's 32nm High-K Metal Gate low-power process, something the company has co-developed with Global Foundries. By moving from 45nm to 32nm, Samsung has managed to boost the clock speed from 1.2GHz to 1.5GHz with the added benefit of the Mali-400MP graphics core being boosted from 267MHz to 400MHz something Samsung claims will boost the graphics performance by up to 50 percent. Of course moving from 45nm to 32nm brings with it the added benefit of lower power usage and Samsung claims that the power usage is down by up to 30 percent. Samsung also threw in support for a few additional video codecs, 1080p video encoding and on-chip HDMI 1.4 support. The Exynos 4212 should be available from next quarter, although we have a feeling it might take a little bit longer until we see devices based on it, at least from anyone but Samsung.

If that's not an impressive range of announcements all at once, we don't know what is and we can see why Apple is so concerned about Samsung. It's become clear that Samsung is a major force in the market and the company is seemingly putting a lot of effort into becoming a leader in the mobile market space, not only in terms of producing high-end devices, but also when it comes to offering the best components that goes into the devices as well. By having its own components echo system, Samsung doesn't have to rely on partners either, something that can seriously hold a company back at times. That said, it can be a dangerous gamble to be too over reliant on your own abilities too, but then again, Samsung doesn't seem to rely solely on its own components, as recently launched versions of the Galaxy S II in the US featured Qualcomm processors. Still, we can't wait to see what's next from Samsung.