Scientists have turned another idea from fantasy and science fiction into reality with the development of an “invisibility cloak,” which was demonstrated at the TED conference.

Scientists have turned another idea from fantasy and science fiction into reality with the development of an “invisibility cloak,” which was demonstrated at the TED conference.

 
Professor Baile Zhang led a team from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore to develop a small box made of calcite optical crystal, which he showed could bend light around an object, making anything placed behind the box appear as invisible.
 
The research is in the early stages, but the team were able to demonstrate the ability to cloak a cylindrical tube, part of which appeared invisible when behind the cloaking material.
 
 
Zhang's inspiration for the idea was “fun,” because he thought it would be cool. He said he hopes this experiment shows that simple tools can be used to fulfil important functions.
 
The technology only works on a small scale at the moment, but that will likely change in the coming months and years. It could be applied to many different sectors, but we expect the military will be particularly interested in this. A previous breakthrough allowed the ability to make objects invisible to thermal-imaging devices, but this technique goes even further.
 
Invisibility cloaking might have seemed far-fetched when it was used by Harry Potter or to hide spacecraft in Star Trek, but scientists are continually pushing the boundaries of our ability and understanding; in many ways it is these works of fiction that give the inspiration for the technology of tomorrow.
 
Source: The Telegraph