800px Palais de la Decouverte Tyrannosaurus rex p1050042 Scientists pinpoint more precise date for dinosaur extinction

Scientists from around the world have determined the most accurate date for the extinction of dinosaurs, which supports the theory that they were wiped out by a comet or asteroid.

Scientists from around the world have determined the most accurate date for the extinction of dinosaurs, which supports the theory that they were wiped out by a comet or asteroid.

 
Researchers from the Glasgow University, Berkeley Geochronology Centre, University of California, and Vrije Univesity Amsterdam teamed up to date rock and ash samples near the fossilised remains of dinosaurs, using a technique called argon-argon dating, considered one of the most precise methods of dating rock.
 
The team were able to pinpoint the demise of the monstrous beasts to around 66,038,000 years ago, with an error margin of around 11,000 years. This is the most detailed approximation of the extinction of dinosaurs to date.
 
800px Palais de la Decouverte Tyrannosaurus rex p1050042 Scientists pinpoint more precise date for dinosaur extinction
 
The significance of the dating is that it coincides with the impact of a comet or asteroid, giving new credibility to a theory first made in 1980 that dinosaurs were wiped out in this way. Some scientists refuted that theory, suggesting dinosaurs died out as much as 300,000 years before the comet struck.
 
It is believed that a 10km-wide rock struck an area off the coast of Mexico, resulting in a massive 180km-wide crater called Chicxulub, while also sending debris across the world. The team now propose that this had a definite impact on the end of dinosaurs, though they acknowledge that it probably was not the only factor.
 
The findings were published in the Science journal.
 
Source: BBC
Image Credit: David Monniaux