seagate pulsar Seagate is readying Pulsar.2 SSD with 12Gbps SAS interface

It was only last week that HGST, a division of Western Digital announced that it was working on a 12Gbps SAS SSD and now Seagate has followed up with its own announcement, but with a little bit more meat on the bones. Seagate is getting ready to show off its 12Gbps SSD at the SCSI Trade Association technology showcase this week and Seagate was kind enough to provide a name for the product, Pulsar.2.

It was only last week that HGST, a division of Western Digital announced that it was working on a 12Gbps SAS SSD and now Seagate has followed up with its own announcement, but with a little bit more meat on the bones. Seagate is getting ready to show off its 12Gbps SSD at the SCSI Trade Association technology showcase this week and Seagate was kind enough to provide a name for the product, Pulsar.2.

The Pulsar.2 will as such have a SAS 12Gbps interface and Seagate is targeting the new SSD towards the server and storage solution market. Little else is known about the product, but Seagate is making a big deal about the fact that using SAS 12Gbps drives rather than PCI Express based SSDs allows for better scalability and serviceability, in the latter case thanks to the hot swap ability of SAS drives.

Unlike HGST, Seagate doesn't talk about any dual interface option for increased performance; however the press release mentions a move towards SAS 12Gbps on hard drives in the future. The advantage in this case though is that SAS 12Gbps and 6Gbps drives can be used in a mixed environment where say, an older SAS controller is being used, but once the controller or server is upgraded, the drives would potentially offer a small performance boost.

Seagate also let us know that the SAS 12Gbps standard is expected to be finished by the end of the year, but no products are expected in the market until 2013 and most won't turn up until the second half which seem quite late for something that's being demoed already. That said, we're talking server products here and reliability is everything, so corner cutting isn't exactly an option.

Source: Seagate