Apple Computer fans are upset over a security chip found in a special x86-based PowerMac–a chip designed to prevent people from loading the company’s new Intel-centered OS onto non-Apple machines. Apple supplied the Intel-fitted PowerMac to members of its Apple Developer Connection, a group for software programmers. The PowerMac includes a microcontroller known as the Trusted Platform Module–TPM for short–that contains a digital signature necessary in order to install the Mac OSX operating system onto the box. Participating developers received a PowerMac that runs on an Intel D915GUX motherboard powered by a Pentium 4 660 Prescott that reaches top speeds of 3.60GHz. The existence of the TPM chip, manufactured by Infineon Technologies, is no guarantee that Apple will be using it in the final Macintosh products shipping next year.

Apple Computer fans are upset over a security chip found in a special x86-based PowerMac–a chip designed to prevent people from loading the company’s new Intel-centered OS onto non-Apple machines. Apple supplied the Intel-fitted PowerMac to members of its Apple Developer Connection, a group for software programmers. The PowerMac includes a microcontroller known as the Trusted Platform Module–TPM for short–that contains a digital signature necessary in order to install the Mac OSX operating system onto the box. Participating developers received a PowerMac that runs on an Intel D915GUX motherboard powered by a Pentium 4 660 Prescott that reaches top speeds of 3.60GHz. The existence of the TPM chip, manufactured by Infineon Technologies, is no guarantee that Apple will be using it in the final Macintosh products shipping next year.