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Seven Japanese chipmakers to challenge Intel, AMD

Not content with the American domination of the CPU industry, seven of Japan’s dominant processor designers and manufacturers have teamed up to create a revolutionary new microprocessor.

The coalition is led by the NEC and Renesas merger, which makes them world’s third largest chipmaker. Joining them is Hitachi, Toshiba, Fujitsu, Panasonic and Canon. A dizzying crowd of electronic giants, indeed.

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Not content with the American domination of the CPU industry, seven of
Japan’s dominant processor designers and manufacturers have teamed up to
create a revolutionary new microprocessor.

The coalition is led by the NEC and Renesas merger, which makes them
world’s third largest chipmaker. Joining them is Hitachi, Toshiba,
Fujitsu, Panasonic and Canon. A dizzying crowd of electronic giants,
indeed.

They intend to create a commercial CPU that runs on power cells, uses
power based on the amount of data processed and remains switched on even
during power cuts. A current prototype is reported to be running at 30%
the power of current CPUs.

This new standard, along with the CPU, will be introduced in 2012. And it is not just PCs – derivatives of the processor will be designed for an entire range of consumer electronics.

Even if the Seven Samurai product does end up largely more than attractive than Intel or AMD CPUs, the transition from x86 will no doubt take years, as it takes time for support and software to build up for a new platform. Nevertheless, this might just be the future of computing. That has probably been said before, but when seven of Japan’s largest electronic giants come together, surely, they mean business.

Reference: Engadget

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