Siri and cars – “Eyes Free” technology to make cell phones and driving a safer combination

eyesfree Siri and cars   Eyes Free technology to make cell phones and driving a safer combination

During its WWDC announcements yesterday, Apple made an announcement regarding iOS' voice assistant 'Siri' which, along with many other iOS features, has seen upgrades in iOS 6. According to the company, Siri voice assistance will be added to a number of cars.

During its WWDC announcements yesterday, Apple made an announcement regarding iOS' voice assistant 'Siri' which, along with many other iOS features, has seen upgrades in iOS 6. According to the company, Siri voice assistance will be added to a number of cars.

This "Eyes Free" system will make it much easier and safer to do a lot of the things which usually make cell phones and driving a bad combination.

eyesfree Siri and cars   Eyes Free technology to make cell phones and driving a safer combination

"Through the voice command button on your steering wheel, you'll be able to ask Siri questions without taking your eyes off the road," said Apple on its iOS 6 website. In fact, in order to even further prevent any visual distractions, the Eyes Free system will prevent the iOS device from lighting up when the feature is being used. The screen will stay dark, as the only thing needed to interact with it will be voice.

"With the Eyes Free feature, ask Siri to call people, select and play music, hear and compose text messages, use Maps and get directions, read your notifications, find calendar information, add reminders, and more," said Apple.

Apple's iOS chief Scott Forstall mentioned nine car manufactures taking part in the addition of Eyes Free technology to vehicles, including BMW, General Motors, Mercedes, Land Rover, Jaguar, Audi, Toyota, Chrysler, and Honda.

This feature will presumably take advantage of another upgrade to the iOS software, which is the new Maps application by Apple. Apple is abandoning Google Maps in the new version of iOS, using their own application which will include turn-by-turn navigation guides with spoken directions, real time traffic information, and alternate route suggestions.

This makes sense when considering controversy last year involving Apple's location-tracking on iOS devices. At the time, the company claimed that the collection of anonymous location data was taking place to create a "crowd-sourced traffic database" to be a part of a future "improved traffic service."

Along with rumors about Apple's iTV, and Google's self-driving vehicle, it seems that IT makers are at least partly turning their attention to improving conventional technology with the digital marvels of today. 

It is nice to see the experience of older inventions being improved and upgraded, rather than forgotten and replaced. 

Source:PC Magazine

Brandon is an A+ certified technician and freelance writer living in East Tennessee. He loves God, writing, science (especially technology) and philosophy. He is currently preparing to enter the field of information security.