iss Space internet used to issue commands to robot on Earth

An astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) has issued commands to a robot on Earth using a new interplanetary internet, paving the way for enhanced communications between astronauts and people back home.

An astronaut on the International Space Station (ISS) has issued commands to a robot on Earth using a new interplanetary internet, paving the way for enhanced communications between astronauts and people back home.

 
The new technology, developed jointly by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA, is called Disruption-Tolerant Networking (DTN) and has the potential to help safely deliver more data from space missions back to Earth, addressing existing problems with rovers sent to Mars.
 
Sunita Williams, ISS Expedition 33 Commander, used a laptop with the DTN software to successfully direct a rover in Germany. The idea going forward is to replace the existing point-to-point communication systems used to control rovers on Mars with the new, more data durable internet.
 
iss Space internet used to issue commands to robot on Earth
 
The DTN was a project long in the making, with proposals made a decade ago by Vint Cerf, one of the creators of the internet. The space internet is similar to the one back home, but as its name implies it is more tolerant to delays and disruptions that are possible when sending data over such large distances, where data may take minutes rather than seconds to arrive, sometimes due to solar storms or planetary interference.
 
The delays are dealt with using a network of nodes, where data is held at one node when there is a disruption, before attempting to send on again later. This prevents the data loss that is capable when a transmission fails on the normal internet.
 
The technology is likely too expensive to replace our normal internet here, but it could become part of smaller networks, such as those used by the military, where data loss prevention is important.
 
Source: BBC