echo2 Sprint resumes rollout of Gingerbread update for Kyocera Echo

“If you don't succeed at first, try and try again” is the kind of saying most people often live by when it comes to pursuing a goal, and it seems that even a huge telecommunications operator like Sprint is no exception to the rule. In just nine days after the company pulled its faulty Android 2.3.4 update for Kyocera's dual-screen Echo smartphone, Sprint has resumed rolling out the update after working with Kyocera to address the issue. And guess what? It actually works this time.

echo2 Sprint resumes rollout of Gingerbread update for Kyocera Echo

Nine days ago, Sprint found itself in quite an unfortunate situation when it officially rolled out a highly anticipated update to users of Kyocera's dual-screen Echo smartphone. According to Sprint, the upgrade was supposed to provide such users with access to version 2.3.4 of the Android operating system, which boasts a whole bunch of performance and power-related enhancements.

Unfortunately, it seemed that Murphey's Law suddenly came into play, and the result was that users who were expected to score a free performance boost walked away with a dual-screen brick of a smartphone, thus forcing Sprint to pull the upgrade until further notice. Well, the good news is that Sprint has apparently gotten its act together this time, for the company has claimed that it has worked with Kyocera to resolve an issue which was reportedly causing the update to turn the Echos into digital breaks, as can be seen from the latest updates made on Sprint's community forum. And the good news is that it actually works this time:

echo Sprint resumes rollout of Gingerbread update for Kyocera Echo

echo3 Sprint resumes rollout of Gingerbread update for Kyocera Echo

That being said, Engadget has suggested that Sprint might be attempting to tread a little more carefully this time its disastrous experience with the first Gingerbread rollout for the Kyocera Echo. According to the popular gadget site, it is likely that Sprint will initially limit the rollout to “a small number of handsets”, ostensibly to ensure that the update is indeed working properly before initiating a full-scale deployment of the update. Well, better late than never, right?

Source: Engadget