290356 Sprint to Continue with Unlimited iPhone Data Plans

According to Dan Hesse, CEO of Sprint Nextel, Sprint will continue to offer their unlimited data plans for the iPhone even if the next incarnation of the device gets LTE.

According to Dan Hesse, CEO of Sprint Nextel, Sprint will continue to offer their unlimited data plans for the iPhone even if the next incarnation of the device gets LTE.

290356 Sprint to Continue with Unlimited iPhone Data Plans

With the different networks available for the iPhone, including Verizon, one might wonder what would even tempt someone to purchase an iPhone with Sprint, a smaller network. However, Hesse believes that the factor which defines Sprint from other iPhone carriers is its unlimited data plan.

“Frankly, it's a marriage made in heaven.” he told CNET, regarding iPhones and unlimited data. "We're clearly attracting customers from our competitors."

Earlier this year, Hesse said, responding to allegations that the network throttled user’s unlimited Data, "Sprint is the only national carrier offering smartphone users truly unlimited data with no throttling, metering or overages while on the Sprint network."

So called “throttling” is a common practice with companies who claim to offer unlimited data. More often than not, cell phone carriers will choke the traffic of its users with the highest data usage, usually around the top 1-5%. This makes their networks about as useful as dialup connections. This practice, which confuses users who thought that "unlimited" meant "unlimited, is often condemned as dishonest. 

As such, Sprint may have a selling point that will attract users away from other iPhone networks. The idea may have already attracted new customers. In its first-quarter report, Sprint activated 1.5 million iPhones, 44% of them coming from brand new Sprint customers.

Hopefully, Sprint’s practices will encourage its competition to come up with better data strategies. As we move into an era where rich media content becomes more complex and prevalent, unlimited data may necessarily become the status quo.

Source: CNET