Tablets and e-readers signal end of real books

 Tablets and e readers signal end of real books

Tablet computers and e-readers may put an end to real paper-based books, according to a number of studies on the continuing growth of the ebook market.

Tablet computers and e-readers may put an end to real paper-based books, according to a number of studies on the continuing growth of the ebook market.

 
The US Book Industry Study Group (BISG) found that close to half of those who bought both print and digital books would abandon the hard copies for just the ebook versions, provided they were released within three months of the physical version.
 
Juniper Research projected that ebooks would make $3.2 billion this year, and that this figure would more than triple to $9.7 billion by 2016.
 
Much of the success of the ebook market can be attributed to the tablet and e-reader boom in 2010 and 2011, largely due to companies like Apple and Amazon, with the latter enjoying its best Christmas for Kindle sales this year.
 
 Tablets and e readers signal end of real books
 
Initial concerns over reading books on a digital device have largely dissipated, particularly with the Kindle E Ink display, which does a relatively good job at imitating real paper, helping avoid glare and eye strain associated with traditional screens.
 
Price appears to be a dominant factor in the move to ebooks, with digital versions of a book costing a fraction of their real-world price. Normal paperbacks can cost several dollars to print, even moreso for print on demand titles, which drives up prices. Tack on warehouse storage costs and delivery charges, and it is no surprise that both companies and consumers are beginning to prefer ebook versions, which often cost as little as $0.99.
 
Analysts at both Gartner and Creative Strategies believe that it is only a matter of time before ebooks replace ink-and-paper books completely, though the shift might only apply to younger generations.
 
While ebooks are certainly set to boom further, and will likely become the dominant form of reading, it is unlikely that traditional hard copies will die out altogether. In many cases they will remain a collector's item, while there will also be a large number of people who prefer the touch and smell of the genuine article.
 
Source: AFP