Teen wins Intel award for breast cancer research

 Teen wins Intel award for breast cancer research

A US teenager has won the top prize of $100,000 from the Intel Science Talent Search competition for his groundbreaking research on breast cancer, which could revolutionise treatment.

A US teenager has won the top prize of $100,000 from the Intel Science Talent Search competition for his groundbreaking research on breast cancer, which could revolutionise treatment.

 
17-year-old Nithin Tumma, from Fort Gratiot, Michigan, was awarded the prestigious first place honours from the Intel Foundation after he discovered that certain proteins in cancer cells could be inhibited to slow their growth and decrease their malignancy.
 
The potential benefits of this finding include the development of a more direct, targeted, effective and less toxic treatment for breast cancer, a goal that many scientists have been working on for some time.
 
 Teen wins Intel award for breast cancer research
 
Tumma is first in his class of 332, is a varsity tennis player and does volunteer work for the Port Huron Museum, where he initiated a restoration program for historical and cultural landmarks, showing that his contributions to society extend beyond his scientific research.
 
Tumma was not the only teen to win awards. Andrew Sushko and Mimi Yen, both also 17, won second and third place respectively for their developments in tiny motors and the study of the evolution and genetics of microscopic worms.
 
“We invest in America’s future when we recognize the innovative achievements of our nation’s brightest young minds,” said Paul Otellini, President and CEO of Intel. “Hands-on experience with math and science, such as that required of Intel Science Talent Search finalists, encourages young people to think critically, solve problems and understand the world around them. Rather than simply memorizing facts and formulas, or repeating experiments with known outcomes, this competition engages students in an exciting way and provides a deeper level of understanding in such important but challenging subjects.”