To date the most prominent company when it comes to Wi-Fi enabled SD cards has been Eye-Fi, especially as the company has managed to combined Wi-Fi and storage, although Toshiba did launch a competing product back in September. Now the Wi-Fi Association has finally decided that it's time to standardise things and somehow still managed to bodge things up by creating two standards.

To date the most prominent company when it comes to Wi-Fi enabled SD cards has been Eye-Fi, especially as the company has managed to combined Wi-Fi and storage, although Toshiba did launch a competing product back in September. Now the Wi-Fi Association has finally decided that it's time to standardise things and somehow still managed to bodge things up by creating two standards.

The good news is that the so called Wireless LAN SD standard supports the 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi standards and it will apparently be available for both full size SD/SDHC/SDXC cards as well as for the micro verities thereof. This is all great news and the SD Association is banging on about how it'll make it easier for consumers to upload their holiday photos and videos to their computers without the need of cables and of course to share the same directly from the camera onto the interwebs directly from the camera.

It will apparently even be able to transfer files directly between cameras, or to smartphones and tablets without the need of an access point. Even more intriguingly the SD Association is suggesting that you'll be able to use your Wireless LAN SD card equipped devices to control various other devices, although we're not entire clear how that's meant to work, albeit we have a feeling that some of this is DLNA related.

The problem is that the SD Association has created two standards and the only way you'll be able to tell the two apart is by the logo on your SD card. Even more confusingly, a card can support both standards and as such has to carry both logos. The first standard has a W shaped logo and sports a web interface and apparently supports server uploads and peer-to-peer functions. The second standard has a D shaped logo and has somehow been designed for home networks as it supports home network communication and server uploading.

The details are sketchy at best and either we're miss-reading the details posted by the SD Association or it has managed to come up with an overly complex way to describe the difference between the two standards. In as much as we've had moments when it would've been handy to be able to transfer a picture from our camera onto a smartphone for a quick upload, we've never felt the need to offload the pictures on our camera to a PC this way, but then again this might be exactly what a lot of people want to do. It will be interesting to see how the awkwardly named Wireless LAN SD memory card standard evolves, but at least it's a standard, well two standards really, but it should hopefully lower the cost for this kind of technology in the future, as the Eye-Fi cards are still quite pricey for what you get.

Source: The SD Association