6 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

With the Tsunami’s side panel removed, you can see that there is a lot of room inside the case. Unfortunately, the Tsunami does not come with a removable motherboard try like its Wave Master counterpart, making motherboard swaps and other work on your PC a little less enjoyable.

10 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

Here we can see the four 5.25″ and two 3.5″ exposed drive bays on the Tsunami’s front panel. Drives are just slid into the case using the provided drive mounts, an idea I first did not like in cases but eventually grew into.

14 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

Towards the bottom of the case we can see the drive cage that can house up to five 3.5″ internal devices.

13 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

Right in front of the drive cage we can see a 120mm intake fan that acts to both circulate air throughout your case and to keep your hard drives running cool.

11 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

I first ran into the idea of locking in your PCI devices using clips with the Centurion 5, and did not like them because of their cheap implementation. However, the Tsunami has an easier to use and more durable design, one that I did not mind using for my AGP and PCI devices.

7 Thermaltake Tsunami Review

Of course also included is a blue LED 120mm exhaust fan. A feature that is often overlooked is the included chassis intruder detector. You can see it on the bottom left corner of the case, and when coupled with a motherboard that supports it, will sound an alarm if your side panel is opened. This is not a feature that I would use in my system, but since Thermaltake is giving you the option of locking up your front bezel, I suppose a chassis intrusion alarm wouldn’t hurt.