So what do we make of the Thermaltake Tsunami? Really, it’s a case that has many nice features and a few annoying design flaws, depending on who you are and what you plan on doing with your computer.

Starting from the exterior of the case, the overall look of the case really can’t be criticized. It does look a lot like the Cooler Master Wave Master at first glance, but really is a completely different kind of case. A nice window and great finish on the Tsunami’s exterior will make sure the case gets a few glances by people passing by, but one of the biggest design flaws for me as an end user is the hidden power button.

The power button is hidden by the Tsunami’s front bezel, making you swing the front bezel open in order to turn on your system. Maybe a nice idea on paper, but for me an annoyance I could do without. It seems that the Tsunami is marketed for those enthusiasts that aren’t looking to trust the people around them, including a chassis intrusion detector along with two locks (side and front panels) with the case.

The interior of the case is great to work with and provides plenty of room, but lacks a feature most enthusiasts look for in their new gaming rigs: a removable motherboard tray. A nice touch to the case are the blue LEDs attached to the front panel and to the exhaust 120mm fan, providing a good looking accent to the case.

Overall, the Thermaltake Tsunami is a good case. It’s easy to work with, very expandable, and great looking. Priced at around $ 130, the Tsunami is not cheap, but should be within many consumer’s budgets. If your the guy that locks up your car in your attached garage, finally we have a case for you.. just dont lose your keys.

85vrmarks s Thermaltake Tsunami Review

Rating: 85 VR-Marks