toshiba thrive angle 665x415 Toshiba AT10LE A tablet (Nvidia Tegra 4 powered) pays a quick visit to the FCC

The Toshiba AT10LE-A could be the world's first ever tablet with a Tegra 4 processor inside. The thing has been in the rumor mill a couple of times before and has been spotted earlier today getting FCC certified. 

While Nvidia’s Tegra 3 SoC has powered a long line of high-end and mid-range Android tablets and phones, including wildly successful devices like the Nexus 7 or HTC’s One X, the company’s next-gen chip, the Tegra 4, struggled to get any design wins.

Toshiba AT10LE A Toshiba AT10LE A tablet (Nvidia Tegra 4 powered) pays a quick visit to the FCC

At first, because we’re now hearing talk of more and more Tegra 4-powered gadgets, especially after the first benchmarks have emerged, with scores that essentially crush Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 600. Aside from Nvidia’s own Shield mobile gaming console, rumor has it there will be at least three tablets using the Tegra 4 chip, plus a number of phones from manufacturers like ZTE.  

Toshiba’s AT10LE-A is one of the tabs that will allegedly pack some Tegra 4 heat, starring in a number of rumors and unconfirmed reports last month and now getting back in the spotlight following a quick FCC visit.

We still have no idea under what name is Toshiba planning to market this slate, but one thing is certain – its commercial release is right around the corner. The FCC certification docs prove that, although they don’t confirm yet the AT10LE-A is on its way to the US.

It can just be the thing will be introduced in Asia, but given we’re expecting it to come with an extremely zippy processor clocked at 1.8 GHz, plus a 10-inch display and Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, that would be a terrible shame.

Other features confirmed by the FCC listing include the already traditional connectivity options, like Wi-Fi a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0 and NFC, whereas 4G LTE is oddly missing from the tab for the moment. Oh, well, there’s still time to spot an LTE-enabled version doing the FCC dance as well, right?

Source: Ameblo Via FCC