Toshiba Small Form1 Toshibas Wipe will erase your encrypted data...without you having to command it to

Do you have some data which is so sensitive that it must not ever leave the PC intact at all? If so, Toshiba has the ideal solution for your needs: a software which securely erases user data upon shutdown, or when the hard disk is extracted from the PC. Is that great, or what?

Read on to find out more.

Toshiba Small Form1 Toshibas Wipe will erase your encrypted data...without you having to command it to

If there is one secret common to most of us, it would be the fact that our hard disks often store a wealth of data, most of it of a very sensitive nature (like fresh downloads of the latest, most popular anime series) . Of course, it goes without saying that such data should never be allowed to see the light of day, lest one wants to suffer some undesirable consequences.

But when circumstances beyond one’s control requires that the hard disk be surrendered, it is of utmost importance that the data do not ever make it out of your PC at all. And that is precisely what Toshiba is claiming to offer with its new Wipe-enabled hard disks.

Apparently, Toshiba’s Wipe technology for its Self-Encrypting Drives (SED) grants an administrator near complete control of the data stored within the device. Toshiba claims that its Wipe technology will enable system administrators to securely erase user data as soon the system is powered down, or when the hard disk is extracted from the PC. Toshiba also states that the technology will be very useful in securing lost or stolen devices, as Wipe has the ability to immediately disable the hard disk’s encryption keys, thus ensuring that none of the data stored can be retrieved by unauthorized eyes.

Of course, it goes without saying that the potential of a self-destructing hard disk cannot be underestimated. And if anything, it will probably throw a huge spanner in the works for law enforcement agencies seeking to recover incriminating data, since there is nothing they can do without any access to the encryption keys. But then again, personal data security always triumphs over legal implications, right?

Source: Engadget