reddit U.S. military to launch social site like reddit

The U.S. military is launching a reddit knockoff called Eureka, but don’t expect anonymity as a point of focus when it comes to posting on Eureka.  According to various sources, Eureka’s users will be mainly of the U.S. military, and its content will be highly moderated.  Instead of up voting or down voting user posted contents, Eureka will have restricted “ideas” which users can vote on. 

reddit(1) U.S. military to launch social site like reddit

The U.S. military is launching a reddit knockoff called Eureka, but don’t expect anonymity as a point of focus when it comes to posting on Eureka.  According to various sources, Eureka’s users will be mainly of the U.S. military, and its content will be highly moderated.  Instead of up voting or down voting user posted contents, Eureka will have restricted “ideas” which users can vote on. 

Therefore, Eureka may be more of a user generated manuals or suggestion page for the U.S. military rather than an open platform for raising awareness for news and ideas. 

On top of highly moderated contents, Eureka will have firewalls which mean that if you’re not a military personnel or affiliated with the military then chances are you won’t be able to access it.  It’s quite clear that Eureka won’t be available to the general public, and people familiar with the matter states that the site will focus on expressing ideas that solve “problems that plague the military and hamper efficiency.”

Many private sector employers are seeking to eliminate social networking at work to promote efficiency, but the military, meanwhile, is seeking to use it to boost efficiency.  The idea behind it is counter intuitive, but not quite irrational.  Reddit manager Erik Martin says that it “seems like a perfect fit” for the military to be utilizing the reddit format since both the social networking site and the military emphasize conciseness.

Reddit uses acronyms such as TIL (Today I Learned) and IAMA (Ask Me Anything) on their site, and Martin predicts that the military may implement such communication methods in their Eureka site.

Reference: wired.com