Apple vs Samsung Upcoming Apple Samsung meeting might see an end to feud

Six months ago Apple filed a lawsuit against Samsung for infringing Apple’s tablet design patents.  The feud has been ongoing, but maybe the upcoming meeting between Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook and Samsung’s Chief Executive Choi Gee-Sung put an end to the bickering.

Samsung and Apple seem to have a love-hate relationship as the two tech giants have been in business together for many years.  As of late, however, the trend has shifted towards the ‘hate’ end of the spectrum. 

Six months ago Apple filed a lawsuit against Samsung for infringing Apple’s tablet design patents.  The feud has been ongoing, but maybe the upcoming meeting between Apple’s CEO, Tim Cook and Samsung’s Chief Executive, Choi Gee-Sung, can put an end to the bickering. 

JK Sin, Samsung’s mobile division chief, said “there is still a big gap in the patent war with Apple but we still have several negotiation options including cross-licensing,” before taking off to America to accompany Gee-Sung. 

Apple and Samsung have reached out to each other in an attempt to settle previous lawsuits.  According to pcworld.com, Steve Jobs contacted Samsung in July 2010 to work out intellectual property issues between the two companies. 

If you have been following the Oracle and Google court battle then you can see some similarities between the two scenarios.  Google used Oracle’s Java API to develop the Android smartphone OS, and initially Sun Microsystems (pre-Oracle buyout) didn’t have a problem with it.  Several years down the road, however, when Google’s Android became the most dominant smartphone platform, Oracle stepped in and filed lawsuits for infringement of copyrights. 

Just like how Oracle provides the API for the Android platform’s development, Samsung provides Apple with hardware that are used in iPhones.  Samsung can benefit from business of one of the world’s most coveted company, and Apple relies on Samsung for one of its hottest selling product.  No one should come out the loser in this situation. 

Despite the indifferences between the two companies, it wouldn’t harm either company to settle their intellectual property arguments outside of court.  If the Cook and Gee-Sung doesn’t manage to work out some sort of bargain then we will see another Google-Oracle-esque court proceeding in about two months.