US and EU oppose Russian proposal to tax the internet

The United States and European Union have revealed that they will oppose a proposal by Russia to tax the internet and make it easier to track people online.

The United States and European Union have revealed that they will oppose a proposal by Russia to tax the internet and make it easier to track people online.

 
A major internet conference will be held from 3-14 December in Dubai, with all 193 countries that are members of the International Telecommunications Union meeting to debate new internet regulations.
 
Russia has proposed a tax on companies like Google and Yahoo if they deliver content abroad, while also suggesting the implementation of more sophisticated methods to trace what people do online. The proposals have received the backing of China and a number of countries in Africa and the Middle East.
 
On the opposite side of the fence is the US and EU, backed by Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, and a number of other countries, all of whom believe the proposals will limit innovation and damage commerce. 
 
 US and EU oppose Russian proposal to tax the internet
 
There are also fears over free speech. Russia claims its suggestions are designed to tackle cybercrime, but the European Union thinks this is an excuse to control freedom of expression online.
 
Google has already voiced its opposition to the conference, calling on internet users to sign an online petition against the proposals. It was particularly against the idea of having to pay a fee every time someone in another country accesses some of its content, as this would likely lead to what many activists call an “information black out” in poorer countries.
 
“The European Union's firm view is that the Internet works,” said Neelie Kroes, European Commissioner for Internet Policy. “If it ain't broke, don't fix it.”
 
Source: Reuters
Image Credit: Google