titan supercomputer US claims worlds most powerful supercomputer with Titan

The United States has sealed its claim to the top spot for supercomputing thanks to its latest rig built by Cray at the Orak Ridge National Laboratory, utilising AMD processors and Nvidia graphics cards to make it the fastest and most powerful computational machine in the world.

The United States has sealed its claim to the top spot for supercomputing thanks to its latest rig built by Cray at the Orak Ridge National Laboratory, utilising AMD processors and Nvidia graphics cards to make it the fastest and most powerful computational machine in the world.

 
The new system, aptly dubbed Titan, is capable of a whopping 17.59 petaflops, which is thousands of trillions of calculations per second. This beats the previous record holder, the IBM-built Sequoia supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, which was capable of an equally impressive 16.32 petaflops.
 
Titan, based in Tenessee, is used for climate studies, material research, fuel combusation analysis, and nuclear power simulation. It is 10 times faster than Jaguar, Oak Ridge's previous supercomputer, which held the record in 2009.
 
titan supercomputer US claims worlds most powerful supercomputer with Titan
 
The system is made up of 18,688 processing nodes, with a mind-boggling 710TB of memory. Each node utilises a 16-core AMD Opteron 6274 processor and an adapted Nvidia Tesla K20X graphics card, helping it achieve its record-breaking computing speeds, and also helping it lower the supercomputer's carbon footprint compared to systems using CPUs alone, especially considering Titan uses roughly the same amount of electricity as 9,000 homes. Despite how monumental that sounds, Titan was able to achieve its 10 times faster speeds over Jaguar while only increasing power consumption by 20 percent.
 
The Top500 list of supercomputers shows where the world's powers are in terms of computational ability, with the US generally leading the race. Japan stole the lead in 2011 with the K computer, which was the first to surpass the 10 petaflop mark, but Sequoia returned the crown to the US in June of this year. Titan ensures that crown sits firmly in place, but in the fast-paced world of supercomputing that can quickly change.