A Republican Congressman in the US has proposed a new law that prohibits further laws from changing or affecting the internet for at least two years, potentially saving it from a series of bills and treaties that some believe could hinder free speech online and invade user privacy.

A Republican Congressman in the US has proposed a new law that prohibits further laws from changing or affecting the internet for at least two years, potentially saving it from a series of bills and treaties that some believe could hinder free speech online and invade user privacy.

 
Darrell Issa, who represents California, put forward a new piece of legislation yesterday, the Internet American Moratorium Act, that could give the internet, and many internet-based companies, a breather for the next two years.
 
The move follows a number of proposed laws and trade agreements, such as SOPA, PIPA, ACTA and CISPA, that critics suggested would lead to censorship online. Many of the previous proposals were designed to tackle the rise in piracy, but they were so broad they would likely cause more damage than they would solve.
 
 
Issa has been a major opponent of the previous legislation attempts, but he also voted in favour of the widely-criticised CISPA. His Twitter bio says: “I also greatly enjoy an #OPEN, accessible & uncensored internet.” 
 
He uploaded the legislation to keepthewebopen.com and agreed to a Q&A on Reddit, where there are mixed views on his proposal. Some view it as a genuine attempt to protect the internet, while others see it as purely a political move to help repair the image of the Republican party. Some even think it might be a trojan horse to help undo current laws or pave the way for significant changes to how the internet is run.
 
Regardless, Issa is pushing ahead with his hope that his legislation will unburden the internet – at least for a two year period.
 
Image Credit: Svilen Milev