worker facebook US graduates who post inappropriate photos online are 84 percent less likely to get job interviews

College graduates in the US who post inappropriate photos online reduce their chances of getting a job interview by a whopping 84 percent, according to a study by anti-virus firm AVG.

College graduates in the US who post inappropriate photos online reduce their chances of getting a job interview by a whopping 84 percent, according to a study by anti-virus firm AVG.

 
The research, part of AVG's Digital Diaries, surveyed 230 human resources professionals in the US and UK, in addition to 4,400 people between the ages of 18 and 25 in 11 different countries.
 
The results show that the vast majority of young people do not review their online profiles, which means they could be negatively impacting their career prospects. In fact, the study shows that social media is becoming a major asset to recruiters in determining the qualities of potential candidates.
 
90 percent of human resources professionals search for unprotected profiles in order to assess applicants, and those who have photos of themselves drunk, for example, are significantly less likely to get the job, with recruiters assuming that this irresponsibility displayed online would likely carry over into work life or negatively affect the reputation of the company.
 
worker facebook US graduates who post inappropriate photos online are 84 percent less likely to get job interviews
 
91 percent of recruiters will not offer an interview if they find evidence of “obnoxious behaviour,” over 90 percent will pass on an applicant if they find nude photographs on their profile, 93 percent will never call back if they find extremist or racist comments, and a whopping 95 percent will pass over a candidate if they have been making derogatory comments about their previous employer.
 
If you think this is all talk, close to 50 percent have already turned down applicants because of their online profiles, and that includes Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, and Flicker, with the vast majority of recruiters searching the first three.
 
“AVG’s latest research shows that the Internet and social networks in particular, have changed the way that human resources professionals approach the recruitment process,” said Tony Anscombe of AVG. “Nowadays, online content posted about, or by a candidate, has become the modern day equivalent of a first interview. AVG’s research emphasises that our digital brand is potentially just as important as our resume. AVG encourages consumers to take control of their online privacy — more than ever, young adults need to proactively manage their online brand to avoid missing out on career opportunities.”