US immigration and customs agency to test BlackBerry 10 platform

The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency has indicated that it will be testing BlackBerry 10 devices next year, signalling a potential restoration of government confidence in RIM's platform.

The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency has indicated that it will be testing BlackBerry 10 devices next year, signalling a potential restoration of government confidence in RIM's platform.

 
The agency will run a pilot programme employing BlackBerry 10 smartphones and BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10, designed for governments and big businesses, traditionally RIM's strongest audience.
 
RIM has suffered at the hands of Apple's iOS and Google's Android, both of which have stolen essentially all of its consumer market share, while also making a dint in the enterprise sector. Many government agencies that previously used BlackBerry have switched to iPhones or Samsung Galaxy devices, but confidence in RIM is beginning to be restored.
 
 
In October ICE signalled that it would switch to iOS, with 17,600 employees set to get an iPhone to replace their aging BlackBerries. That may change now that it plans to see what BlackBerry 10 is like, and it is a major contract that RIM really needs to secure, not least of all because it is such a large number of devices, but because it will help encourage other agencies to follow suit.
 
After months of doom and gloom, RIM's shares are now enjoying reasonable growth. Today they are up $0.39, or 2.93 percent, to $13.70, at the time of writing, after having gained several percentage points over the last few days. In fact, share prices have more than doubled since September, thanks in part to Goldman Sachs upgrading the company's stock rating from “neutral” to “buy” at the end of November.
 
BlackBerry 10, and a slew of devices running the OS, will launch on 30 January. Many see it as the make or break event for the company, but things are starting to look a little better for the Canadian smartphone maker.
 
Source: Reuters