1984 Big Brother US lawmakers cause controversy with SOPA replacement CISPA

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) has barely been put to rest and lawmakers are already planning a replacement called the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which some are saying is just as dangerous and disastrous as the original.

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) has barely been put to rest and lawmakers are already planning a replacement called the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which some are saying is just as dangerous and disastrous as the original.

 
Policy campaign group Demand Progress said that CISPA would “obliterate any semblance of online privacy in the United States,” while the Center for Democracy and Technology said that the information shared with the government on the grounds of cybersecurity “could be used for other purposes.”
 
The major fears over this latest act is that it gives the government too much power, and even if the intent is to protect from genuine threats, the potential for abuse is too large to allow it to be passed.
 
1984 Big Brother US lawmakers cause controversy with SOPA replacement CISPA
 
Another aspect of the criticism of the bill is that it suggests it's an act designed to address a growing problem of online security, but it is also designed to protect intellectual property, the primary aim of SOPA, despite copyright or piracy not featuring in the name of the act itself. This could be seen as a way to get it passed without drawing too much public attention.
 
Privacy advocates are calling for people to protest the bill in any way or form, including signing online petitions. Just like SOPA, we will likely see major internet firms like Google and Facebook voicing their opposition and drawing widespread awareness to government attempts to snoop on our online activity.
 
A vote for CISPA will be held later this month.
 
Source: The Next Web