It's sometimes easy to forget that there are three x86 CPU makers, as VIA, or rather should we say Centaur has such a small share of the market that no-one really ever thinks of them these days. The company has now announced a new model simply named the VIA QuadCore and as of right now it's only available in a single model. The good news, at least for VIA's partners, is that the new CPU is pin-to-pin compatible with VIA's other CPUs which makes it easy for them to migrate their products across to the QuadCore.

It's sometimes easy to forget that there are three x86 CPU makers, as VIA, or rather should we say Centaur has such a small share of the market that no-one really ever thinks of them these days. The company has now announced a new model simply named the VIA QuadCore and as of right now it's only available in a single model. The good news, at least for VIA's partners, is that the new CPU is pin-to-pin compatible with VIA's other CPUs which makes it easy for them to migrate their products across to the QuadCore.

VIA's first quad core QuadCore CPU will be the L4700 and it has a fairly slow stock clock speed of 1.2GHz and it's actually a pair of VIA Nano X2 chips on a single package. As such we're looking at a total of 4MB of L2 cache, although this isn't shared among all of the cores, as each core has an independent 1MB of L2 cache. The CPU is using VIA's V4 chipset interconnect bus which operates at 1333MHz and the QuadCore does of course also have native 64-bit support.

Interestingly, VIA has allowed for dynamic overclocking of the QuadCore with the L4700 supporting to speed bins (each bin being 133MHz) and with sufficient cooling it can operate at a maximum speed of 1.46GHz. This is quite a far cry from AMD and Intel's quad core CPUs, but then again VIA/Centaur is still ahead of Intel's Atom CPUs and even AMD's Brazos processors when it comes to raw CPU performance.

The main drawback of the QuadCore is its 27.5W TDP which means that this is a CPU that is more likely to end up in small desktops or entry level notebooks than netbooks, but this might be a good thing for VIA as the company finally has a solution that really stands out. However, this all depends of pricing and VIA is going to have to compete with AMD's upcoming Lynx processors which are likely to give the QuadCore a run for its money both in terms of cost and performance. We'll make sure to stop by VIA at Computex to get a closer look at what the company has planned for its new QuadCore CPU.

Source: VIA