License transfers aren’t the only thing the EULA for Microsoft’s Windows Vista OS limits. The license also puts restrictions on how benchmarks of certain components of the OS can be published, another issue that is raising eyebrows as Microsoft still has not clarified how changes will specifically affect users. According to the Vista EULA, because the OS contains “one or more components” of the .Net Framework 3.0, users can conduct internal benchmarking of those components, but can’t disclose the results of those benchmarks — or measurements to compare rival products — unless they comply with conditions found at a Microsoft Web site.

License transfers aren’t the only thing the EULA for Microsoft’s Windows Vista OS limits. The license also puts restrictions on how benchmarks of certain components of the OS can be published, another issue that is raising eyebrows as Microsoft still has not clarified how changes will specifically affect users. According to the Vista EULA, because the OS contains “one or more components” of the .Net Framework 3.0, users can conduct internal benchmarking of those components, but can’t disclose the results of those benchmarks — or measurements to compare rival products — unless they comply with conditions found at a Microsoft Web site.