VPN provider CryptoSeal has shut down its service, over concerns that law enforcement may eventually compromise its user’s privacy with a court ordered request for information .

spy VPN shuts down to protect consumers from snooping authorities

VPN provider CryptoSeal has followed secure email provider Lavabit in shutting down to protect its customers’ privacy, its founder, Ryan Lackey, confirmed Monday in a tweet.

This closure looks to be a temporary issue, as they search for various ways to reopen in the future.

The decision was made by the company to protect users from privacy intrusion as a result of the U.S. Pen register law, which legislates that service providers must have provisions for lawful access and intercept by authorities.

CryptoSeal decided on this plan of action as a result of the Lavabit case, which shuttered after the founder decided that it would be better to close the business than cooperate with authorities who contacted him in hopes that he could reveal information about one of his users named Edward Snowden. Lavabit’s founder is unable to disclose any more details due to a gag order placed on him.

Current subscribers of the VPN have been offered a refund of a year’s worth of another non-U.S. VPN service. Although CryptoSeal has shut down the consumer part of the service, the business side is still working and there are no plans at the moment to cancel them.

As the Internet comes closer under the microscope of surveillance activity from the powers that be, regular web users are slowly being pushed to protect their privacy as a result of harsher laws set in place all over the world. VPNs are used to bypass blocked sites, or masking digital footprints online. Although this looks like a setback for privacy advocates, the temporary cease of operation signals a strong sign of morality and opposition from CryptoSeal in their refusal to comply with intercept and surveillance laws.