WD has begun shipping the WD Caviar RAID Edition (RE) drives, a family of three 3.5-inch, 7,200-RPM drives ranging in capacity from 120GB to 260GB. The drives are specifically designed to challenge competitors like the Maxtor MaxLine drives, which are rated for non-I/O-intensive low-duty cycles. By contrast, the WD Caviar RE drives are rated at 1 million hours mean time before failure (MTBF), running nonstop. WD set out to minimize recovery time with a technique called time-limited error recovery, which takes into account the ability of modern drives to do self-diagnostics and repair or exclude damaged sectors. Using the WD technology, a drive will typically drop off the RAID array for about 30 seconds to adjust its sectors; the maximum time is about five minutes. The three-platter design will offer lower power metrics than its five-platter competitors. The drive consumes 8.2 watts reading and writing, 11.5 watts seeking data, and 16.2 watts spinning up. Acoustic power will range between 28 and 33 dB, depending on the function.

WD has begun shipping the WD Caviar RAID Edition (RE) drives, a family of three 3.5-inch, 7,200-RPM drives ranging in capacity from 120GB to 260GB. The drives are specifically designed to challenge competitors like the Maxtor MaxLine drives, which are rated for non-I/O-intensive low-duty cycles. By contrast, the WD Caviar RE drives are rated at 1 million hours mean time before failure (MTBF), running nonstop. WD set out to minimize recovery time with a technique called time-limited error recovery, which takes into account the ability of modern drives to do self-diagnostics and repair or exclude damaged sectors. Using the WD technology, a drive will typically drop off the RAID array for about 30 seconds to adjust its sectors; the maximum time is about five minutes. The three-platter design will offer lower power metrics than its five-platter competitors. The drive consumes 8.2 watts reading and writing, 11.5 watts seeking data, and 16.2 watts spinning up. Acoustic power will range between 28 and 33 dB, depending on the function.