netbook widi WiDi for netbooks might not be as good as expected

Back at Computex earlier this month Intel was demoing netbooks with WiDi or Wireless Display and Intel seems to call it interchangeably. One of the Intel representatives at the show told us that we could expect 720p video over WiDi from netbooks, but it appears that it might not be the case after all.

Back at Computex earlier this month Intel was demoing netbooks with WiDi or Wireless Display and Intel seems to call it interchangeably. One of the Intel representatives at the show told us that we could expect 720p video over WiDi from netbooks, but it appears that it might not be the case after all.

According to a slide that has found its way to VR-Zone by means of the interweb it now looks fairly certain that we're looking at sub 720p WiDi support. That said, the slide only states "Dynamic resolution up to 600p" but we're assuming that this means that the upcoming Atom N2600 and N2800 netbooks won't be able to cope with 720p content over WiDi. At least 30 fps video is supported, but anything less and a lot of content would've become unwatchable.

netbook widi WiDi for netbooks might not be as good as expected

WiDi in itself is a great idea and we attended a little demo held by Intel Taiwan a couple of weeks back, although that time around Sandy Bridge notebooks were used. The real problem is that the technology is proprietary to Intel and that you need to spend US$99.99 or there about on a receiver or it doesn't work. We're not sure netbook owners would be willing to do this, as it's hard enough convincing notebook users, especially not when an HDMI cable really does the same thing.

Considering that we're looking at Wi-Fi Direct options coming later this year that aren't relying on proprietary technology we really hope Intel is clever enough to add support for this technology as well, but we highly doubt this'll be the case. The cost of entry is still too high for WiDi to become a mainstream technology and on top of that, most consumers don't even know what Wi-Fi card they have in their notebook, let alone which ones works with WiDi. That said, Wi-Fi Direct is similarly quirky, as it requires a driver upgrade which might not be available for whatever Wi-Fi card is fitted by the notebook manufacturer. Wireless video over Wi-Fi will hopefully work itself out and become a single standard at some point in the future, but we're not quite there yet.