Facebook Opera browser Will an Opera facebook marriage end with a happy ending?

Facebook recently acquired Instagram for approximately $1 billion, and if the rumors are true then it might fork out another $1.4 billion to buy out Opera.

Facebook recently acquired Instagram for approximately $1 billion, and if the rumors are true then it might fork out another $1.4 billion to buy out Opera. 

According to WSJ.com, Opera’s ad revenue tripled year on year in the first quarter, pocketing about $6.9 million—which constitutes 15% of the company’s total revenue.  In a recent article on VR-Zone, we discussed that possibility of Facebook making a move at constructing a browser of its own. 

Opera mini mobile 2 Will an Opera facebook marriage end with a happy ending?

Despite Opera’s small market share, the Opera Mobile browser seems to be a popular choice among mobile users.  Opera monetizes from its browser by selling ad space on its home screen, and if Facebook acquires Opera it will have access to an immense amount of user information as well as connections to advertisers. 

WSJ.com reported about 168.8 million users currently uses the Opera Mobile browser.  Furthermore, Opera entices users to continue using its browser because it is “speedier” than its competitors.  Similar to the Amazon’s Silk browser, Opera’s browser displays a page after it compresses the contents through its own server. 

 Will an Opera facebook marriage end with a happy ending?

Facebook’s IPO price was $38, but now it’s fluctuating in the low $30’s range.  Will acquiring Opera and increasing its mobile presence help Facebook dig itself out of a hole?  The tactic makes sense, but if Facebook’s execution is flawed then stock value will surely continue to dip.  Whether Facebook intend to take a big stake in the mobile advertising market, or develop an internet browser for the masses, it can take a page or two out of Google’s Chrome success.  

Google proved that a company with almost no presence in the internet browser market can become a heavyweight contender.  Facebook shares one main advantage that Google held when Chrome came to be—that is, Facebook and Google has a lot of user information.  Developing a browser for the masses requires massive amounts of user data, and Facebook does not lack in that department.

Reference: WSJ.com