Windows 8.x has seen virtually non-existent growth, even after several months since public release.

shutterstock 163531841 Windows 7 still going strong; consumers still not warming up to Windows 8 and 8.1

As noted by NetMarketShare for the month of November, the usage of Windows 8 actually fell by 0.87 percent. This was slightly compensated by a small increase in the market share of Windows 8.1 – bringing the net gain of the 8 family to a paltry 0.05 percent. This is certainly not good news for Microsoft as it means people are responding to the 8.1 update about as well as they responded to Windows 8, which as you know, wasn’t too positive.

Windows 7 remains the most used OS by a huge margin with its share increasing by 0.22 percent, more than four times that of the 8 family. Although Microsoft is encouraging companies to shift from XP to Windows 7 ahead of XP’s death date, they will be undoubtedly be worried that people are still reluctant in shifting to the latest Windows 8.x versions.

Desktop / Mobile OS Strategy: Microsoft vs. Apple

Microsoft launched Windows 8 with many of the old Windows features but with a completely revolutionized interface, giving it a more savvy, modern look. Redmond opted for a “one-for-all” operating system strategy, and the design was intended to improve user experience across desktops, laptops, and tablets. While they may have arguably technically succeeded in that, desktop and laptop users have shown a special “love or ignore” attitude towards it. Those who dislike it, dislike it with a passion. The rest click on the ‘Desktop’ app at bootup to get out of Microsoft’s ‘modern’ touch-optimized OS.

Microsoft’s main competitor Apple has chosen a different approach, keeping its two operating systems separate for different device types: OS X for Macs and iOS for mobile devices. The two OSes have started sharing some features lately, but they are still largely distinct.

Windows 8.x is to Windows 7 what Windows Vista was to Windows 7. Those buying new laptops will keep on shifting to Windows 8, but the rest will stick to the more familiar environment of Windows 7.

Source: NetMarketShare via TechCrunch

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