windows 8 screen resolutions Windows 8 screen resolution recommendations suggest 2560x1440 tablets

Microsoft has apparently decided that Apple's retina display on the new iPad just doesn't cut it, as the company has released details covering common screen sizes for Windows 8 which points towards tablets – or slates as per the diagram – with resolutions of up to 2560×1440 pixels which equates to 291 DPI on a 10.1-inch device.

Microsoft has apparently decided that Apple's retina display on the new iPad just doesn't cut it, as the company has released details covering common screen sizes for Windows 8 which points towards tablets – or slates as per the diagram – with resolutions of up to 2560×1440 pixels which equates to 291 DPI on a 10.1-inch device.

Apple's 9.7-inch iPad manages 264 DPI, or slightly higher pixel density than 11.6-inch Windows 8 tablets which will offer a pixel density of 253 DPI with a 2560×1440 display. These appear to be for high-end devices only, so don't expect this to be the standard for Windows 8 tablets when they arrive, as Microsoft is also listing 1920×1080 and 1366×768 as supported screen resolutions.

windows 8 screen resolutions Windows 8 screen resolution recommendations suggest 2560x1440 tablets

More importantly though, if you have a device with a resolution of 1024×600 or 1280×720, which in the first case is just about every single netbook – apart from the slightly worse 1024×576 resolution – you won't be able to run the Metro UI. We can't think of a single notebook or screen with 1280×720 resolution though, albeit there were a few TV's with this resolution in the early days of LCD TVs. That said, Windows 8 will support any display with a height of at least 768 pixels, so even old 1024×768 displays will work with the Metro UI.

Microsoft has also worked out what it thinks is the ideal sweet spots for pixel density on various resolution displays, as well as the ideal touch target size, i.e. how big the object you're touching will be on the screen at any given pixel density. As such, a touch target size of around 9mm is apparently ideal on an 11.6-inch display at either 1366×768, 1920×1080 or 2560×1440 resolution.

Another interesting aspect of Microsoft's blog post on the subject of displays and resolution for Windows 8 is that the company is asking developers to build apps suitable for higher resolutions and as such wants developers to use scalable vector graphics rather than traditional bitmaps. This is due to the fact that scalable vector graphics will look good at any resolution, whereas bitmaps generally look terrible at non-native resolution. This wasn't done as a direct response to the new iPad, as Microsoft is offering tools to developers that allow them to preview what their Metro apps will look like at various screen sizes and resolutions, something that should hopefully improve the look of Metro apps when Windows 8 launches later this year.

Source: Building Windows 8 blog